dialogue / storytelling / write here write now / writing

AN IMPOSSIBLE CONVERSATION AT SHAKESPEARE AND COMPANY IN PARIS

Jules Verne in 1892 (age 64)

Antoine de Saint-Exupery. Scanned drawing.

Writer Colette

TODAY’S WRITING TIP: IN A DIALOGUE, THE WORDS ARE NOT YOURS, BUT YOUR CHARACTERS’. LET THE WORDS REFLECT NOT WHO YOU ARE, BUT WHO THEY ARE — YOUNG OR OLD, SOPHISTICATED OR PLEBEIAN, CLEAN-SPOKEN OR FOULMOUTHED, INNOCENT OR MALICIOUS.

Marcel Proust in 1900

A LA RECHERCHE DU TEMPS PERDU Marcel Proust in 1900 (Credit: Wikipedia)

In Search of Lost Time, Marcel Proust said, “The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.”

Looking at Paris from My Window, Colette agreed, “The true traveler is he who goes on foot, and even then, he sits down a lot of the time.”

“True!” said Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, imagining Wind, Sand, and Stars, “He who would travel happily must travel light.”

Sensing Colette’s distress, Jules Verne took a line from Around the World in Eighty Days, “A lady could not be expected to travel comfortably under such conditions.”

————

NOTE: This is not a Trifextra entry, but this is inspired by this weekend’s challenge, which is exactly 33 words of dialogue. The words from my beloved French authors alone, culled from their books as specified, are beyond 33 words, so with hope my fellow Trifectans wouldn’t mind that I just share this piece with them, adapted from a chapter in my book Write Here Write Now: Standing at Attention Before My Imaginary Style Dictator.

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